Seahorse Hearts - Waves Project

Seahorse Hearts

Divers are obsessed with finding and photographing these elusive creatures, finding two together is a very rare sight. If you have the privilege to observe them in the wild please give them ample space, they are very delicate.

Seahorses are tiny fish that are named for the shape of their head, which looks like the head of a tiny horse. You’ll find them in the world’s tropical and temperate coastal waters, swimming upright among seaweed and other plants. Seahorses use their dorsal fins to propel slowly forward. To move up and down, seahorses adjust the volume of air in their swim bladders, which is an air pocket inside their bodies.

The male and female seahorse come together repeatedly every morning to dance together. Sometimes they dance with their tails entwined. This is their way of saying hello. It is also their way of staying connected to one another.

After they finish dancing they mate. That’s how the iconic seahorse heart is made. The female passes her eggs to the male during that time. Males carry the eggs 9 to 45 days until the seahorses emerge fully developed, but very small.

This great article was written for the WAVES Project by dedicated WAVES volunteer, Trina – age 13